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we explore the challenges posed by difference – by gender, generation, culture, and sexual orientation

RESEARCH PROJECTS

The Center for Talent Innovation is a thought leader in the talent management space, driving ground-breaking research to help reshape the way businesses think about and manage their human capital. The research uncovers the challenges of and opportunities for today's global talent pool - spanning across the divides of generation, gender, geography and culture. Below is a list of forthcoming projects from CTI and the Task Force for Talent Innovation. Please contact if your organization is interested in getting involved in any of the below projects.

Project
    Target Publication Date

Description

Wonder Women: Flourishing and Thriving on the Frontiers of STEM

Pub. Target: Summer 2018

This timely project will arm both qualified women in STEM and their employers, with the insights, tools and tactics needed to accelerate the progress of female technologists, engineers and scientists. Among other highlights, we will map and measure "perceived bias," create differentiated strategies for under-represented minority women, deliberately include white, male voices, and zero in on risk to brand. There will be a deliberate focus on STEM women in companies where science and technology are not the "business of the business" as well as on tech, engineering and life sciences firms.
Sponsors to date: Bank of America, GE Foundation, Genpact, Intel Corporation, Microsoft

In Transition: Securing the Safety of Trans* Employees

Pub. Target: Summer 2018

As trans* individuals become more accepted in some ways, and more threatened in others, CTI proposes research focusing on the unique challenges and opportunities for trans* employees and their employers. This research will highlight subtle micro-aggressions and overt discrimination and bias facing trans* employees in white collar occupations, and will explore ways companies can support and include them. Better inclusion of trans* individuals can signal to employees of all backgrounds that a company takes diversity and inclusion seriously.
Sponsors to date: Bloomberg LP, Microsoft

The Sponsor Dividend: An Investment Guide for Leaders

Pub. Target: Fall/Winter 2018

As a time-starved leader, why should you devote prime time to sponsoring talent across the divides of gender and ethnicity? What is the pay-off for you, for your firm? CTI's preliminary data show that, done well, sponsoring diverse talent has big up up-sides. This new data-driven study will create a sector-specific "playbook" for executives seeking to be successful, efficient sponsors. Using a rich set of case studies, it will also lay out how inclusive sponsorship drives competitive strength and lifts the bottom line.
Sponsors to date: American Express, Bank of America, Freddie Mac

Off-Ramps, On-Ramps and Agile Careers

Pub. Target: Spring 2019

Our economy has yet to settle into a new work model that maximizes productivity for employers and engagement for employees. Instead, we rely models that developed decades ago for traditional family/economic structures. Yet shifting demographics, family structures, work content, and technology makes old models obsolete. In the wake of these shifts, employers fear loss of productivity while employees confront unsustainable demands from work and home. Media and academia frequently position employer and employee needs as quite distant from one another, but we hypothesize their needs are far from irreconcilable. This project will develop a new model to maximize both employer and employee needs, document those challenges that currently prevent companies from discovering the model themselves, and provide a pathway to overcome them.

Faith at Work

Publication Target: Sept. 2018

Faith, race, and ethnicity are often conflated—creating a point of pain and an opportunity in the workplace. Religious stereotypes can further pigeonhole and limit women and employees of color in the workplace. Yet greater inclusion of faith traditions could open doors for those same employees, allowing them to bring their full identities to work. At the same time, companies looking to create consistent cultures, rooted in corporate values, may clash with those values promoted by a given faith tradition. Employers struggle to help employees navigate these conflicting value sets. This research will document the conflicts--and provide some direction for helping employees navigate them.
Sponsors to date: Accenture, Ernst & Young LLP