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we explore the challenges posed by difference – by gender, generation, culture, and sexual orientation

RESEARCH & INSIGHTS

Through our research, we explore the challenges posed by difference – by gender, generation, culture, and sexual orientation – and map solutions for both individuals and their employers.

In particular, we aim to:

  • Affirm and bolster the business case for diversifying leadership
  • Identify, through robust research, the underlying impediments to the full utilization of the talent spectrum
  • Reveal the mechanisms by which inequities can be addressed
  • Harvest and share best practices across industry sectors.

Our research spans a variety of talent streams, industries and geographies.

  • TALENT STREAMS
  • INDUSTRIES
  • GEOGRAPHIES

Women

LGBT

Multicultural talent

Generations

Financial Services

Life sciences

Technology

Emerging Markets

Germany

Japan

United States

United Kingdom

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Misunderstood Millennial Talent: The Other Ninety-One Percent

Corporate recruiters and employers tend to perceive Millennials as a major flight risk, not worth investing in because they'll be out the door in a year or two. Yet our data reveals this stereotype to be grossly misapplied. While Millennials with a financial safety net are far more likely than those who lack it to be a flight risk, they comprise a mere nine percent of this talent cohort. In Misunderstood Millennial Talent, we bust other myths about employees between the ages of 21 and 34 to stress the imperative to talent specialists of investing in this next generation of leaders. (7/21/2016, Book -196 pages, Center for Talent Innovation, Rare Bird Books, A Vireo Book)

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Sponsors: American Express, Baxalta, Ernst & Young LLP, The Moody's Foundation, NovoNordisk, S&P Global

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The X Factor: Tapping into the Strengths of the 33-to 46- Year- Old Generation

The Baby Boomers and Millennials are demographic darlings but for companies throughout the United States and the European Union, Generation X may be the most important generation of all. At just 46 million in the U.S., Generation X is small compared to the 78 million Boomers and 70 million Gen Ys but they wield a disproportionate amount of influence. Born between 1965 and 1978, they are the bench strength for leadership, the skill bearers and knowledge experts corporations will rely on to gain competitive advantage in the coming decades. Approaching or already in the prime of their lives and careers, they are prepared and poised for leadership. Yet their career progress has been blocked by Boomers—who are postponing retirement—and threatened by leapfrogging Gen Ys. At the same time, they are working harder than ever. In this study we examine Generation X’s attitudes and experiences around work. Companies that acknowledge the issues affecting Gen X have the opportunity to establish programs and practices that will retain and sustain this impressive talent pool, and allow these key men and women to realize their potential. (9/1/2011, Report - 50 pages)

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Sponsors: American Express, Boehringer Ingelheim USA, Cisco, Credit Suisse, Google

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Bookend Generations: Leveraging Talent and Finding Common Ground

Right now, a battle for survival has eclipsed the war for talent. Business leaders are slashing headcounts and budgets, and focusing with laser vision on what it takes to succeed in a deep global recession. But when the economy recovers, companies will return swiftly to the crucial work of recruiting and retaining top performers. Renewal and growth cannot be rekindled without high-octane brain power. Yet the value proposition is changing dramatically in a new era of talent management. Two dominant demographic cohorts—Gen Y and Baby Boomers—are redefining what it takes for a company to be an "employer of choice." The 78 million Boomers and 70 million Gen Ys crave flexibility, personal growth, connection, and opportunities to "give back." The Bookend Generations are remapping old ideals of success as they pursue a "Rewards Remix" that prizes meaning and choice over money. (7/1/2009, Report- 70 pages)

Sponsors: Booz Allen Hamilton, Ernst & Young, Lehman Brothers, Time Warner, UBS

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For international shipping of a printed version please contact us.

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How Gen Y & Boomers Will Reshape Your Agenda

When it comes to workplace preferences, Generation Y workers closely resemble Baby Boomers. Because these two huge cohorts now coexist in the workforce, their shared values will hold sway in the companies that hire them. The authors, from the Center for Work-Life Policy, conducted two large-scale surveys that reveal those values. Gen Ys and Boomers are eager to contribute to positive social change, and they seek out workplaces where they can do that. They expect flexibility and the option to work remotely, but they also want to connect deeply with colleagues. They believe in employer loyalty but desire to embark on learning odysseys. Innovative firms are responding by crafting reward packages that benefit both generations of workers - and their employers. (7/1/2009, Harvard Business Review Article - 6 pages)

Sponsors: Booz Allen Hamilton, Ernst & Young, Lehman Brothers, Time Warner, UBS