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we explore the challenges posed by difference – by gender, generation, culture, and sexual orientation

RESEARCH & INSIGHTS

Through our research, we explore the challenges posed by difference – by gender, generation, culture, and sexual orientation – and map solutions for both individuals and their employers.

In particular, we aim to:

  • Affirm and bolster the business case for diversifying leadership
  • Identify, through robust research, the underlying impediments to the full utilization of the talent spectrum
  • Reveal the mechanisms by which inequities can be addressed
  • Harvest and share best practices across industry sectors.

Our research spans a variety of talent streams, industries and geographies.

  • TALENT STREAMS
  • INDUSTRIES
  • GEOGRAPHIES

Women

LGBT

Multicultural talent

Generations

Financial Services

Life sciences

Technology

Emerging Markets

Germany

Japan

United States

United Kingdom

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Athena 2.0: Accelerating Female Talent in Science, Engineering and Technology

In this report we revisit the science, engineering and tech landscape—expanded to include Brazil, China, India, as well as the U.S.—to determine what has changed for women for the better (since our 2008 report), and to offer solutions for what has resisted change. The good news: the pipeline of global female talent in SET remains rich and deep, with women being the majority of SET college graduates in many key geographies. (2/1/2014, Report - 72 pages)

KEY FINDINGSPRESS RELEASEINFO GRAPHIC VIDEO LINK

Sponsors: American Express, Boehringer Ingelheim USA, BP, Genentech, McKesson Corporation, Merck Serono, Schlumberger, Siemens AG

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On-Ramps and Up-Ramps India

Indian women on-ramp after taking a career break with much greater ease than their counterparts in the U.S., Germany and Japan, but Indian women find it more difficult to regain their career momentum (up-ramp). Building on the Center’s widely covered global work on “Off-Ramps and On-Ramps,” this study adds new fire to the ongoing debate about why highly qualified female talent take career breaks and the challenges they encounter when they try to accelerate their professional ambitions. (4/1/2013, Report - 71 pages)

Please learn more about our consulting partner's, Hewlett Consulting Partners, offering on this topic.

KEY FINDINGS

Sponsors: Citi, Genpact, Sodexo, Standard Chartered Bank, Unilever

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The Battle for Female Talent in Brazil

Women enter the white-collar workforce in the UK in far greater numbers than men: 57 females for every 43 males. Yet as employees in large corporations move from entry-level to middle management, and from mid- to senior-level positions, men advance disproportionately. Women comprise almost a quarter (24 percent) of the “marzipan layer,” that talent-rich level right below the icing on the corporate cake. And there they stall out. For all their qualifications, women represent only 4 percent of CEOs and 6.6 percent of executive directors of the FTSE 100. In addition, women currently hold only 22 percent of seats in Parliament, putting the UK 54th among 189 countries with national parliaments. Why? Our research reveals a surprisingly simple answer: To break through to the top, well-qualified women need sponsors, powerful leaders who are willing to advocate for their next key role or promotion and propel and protect them through the perilous straits of upper management. Furthermore, in order to attract, win and retain such career-boosting backers, women must do their part to ensure the alliance remains mutually beneficial. (12/1/2011, Report - 61 pages)

Sponsors: Bloomberg LP, Booz & Company, Intel, Pfizer, Siemens AG

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Winning the War for Talent in Emerging Markets

The war for talent is heating up in emerging markets. Without enough "brain power," multinationals can't succeed in these markets. Yet they're approaching the war in the wrong way-bringing in expats and engaging in bidding wars for hotshot local "male" managers. The solution is hiding in plain sight: the millions of highly educated women surging into the labor markets of Brazil, Russia, India, China, and the United Arab Emirates. Increasingly, these women boast better credentials, higher ambitions, and greater loyalty than their male peers. But there's a catch: Attracting and retaining talented women in emerging economies requires different strategies than those used in mature markets. Complex cultural forces - family-related "pulls," such as daughterly duties to parents and in-laws, and work-related "pushes," such as extreme hours and dangerous commutes - force women to settle for dead-end jobs, switch to the public sector, or leave the workforce entirely. In Winning the War for Talent in Emerging Markets, Sylvia Ann Hewlett and Ripa Rashid analyze these forces and present strategies for countering them, including: (1) Sustaining ambition through stretch opportunities and international assignments, (2) Combating cultural bias by building an infrastructure for female leadership (networks, mentors, sponsors), (3) Introducing flexible work arrangements to accommodate family obligations, and (4) Providing safe transportation, such as employer-subsidized taxi services. Drawing on groundbreaking research, amplified with on-the-ground examples from companies as diverse as Google, Infosys, Goldman Sachs, and Siemens, this book is required reading for all companies seeking to strengthen their talent pipeline in these rich and expanding markets. (8/1/2011, Book, Harvard Business Press)

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The Battle for Female Talent in Emerging Markets

With rolling debt crises blasting Western economies already weakened by the recession, hopes are resting on the BRICs—the emerging market dynamos of Brazil, Russia, India and China—to power countries and corporations back to growth. Keeping those engines humming is increasingly dependent on women. In the BRICs (which have accounted for 45% of global growth since 2007), female earnings are growing twice as fast as male earnings and women now control two-thirds of consumer spending. Most significantly, the majority of tertiary degrees in these countries now go to women. From Shanghai to São Paulo highly qualified, ambitious women are pouring into the labor market bringing urgency to the challenge of managing diversity. An important component of this study is an exploration of best practice in the private sector—12 cutting-edge initiatives that leverage the newly-rich pool of female talent. (6/1/2010, Report - 44 pages)

Sponsors: Bloomberg LP, Booz & Company, Intel, Pfizer, Siemens AG

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Cover Art

The Battle for Female Talent in Emerging Markets

With rolling debt crises blasting Western economies already weakened by the recession, hopes are resting on the BRICs—the emerging market dynamos of Brazil, Russia, India and China—to power countries and corporations back to growth. Keeping those engines humming is increasingly dependent on women. In the BRICs (which have accounted for 45% of global growth since 2007), female earnings are growing twice as fast as male earnings and women now control two-thirds of consumer spending. Most significantly, the majority of tertiary degrees in these countries now go to women. From Shanghai to Sao Paolo highly qualified, ambitious women are pouring into the labor market bringing urgency to the challenge of managing diversity. An important component of this study is an exploration of best practice in the private sector—12 cutting-edge initiatives that leverage the newly-rich pool of female talent. (5/1/2010, Harvard Business Review Article - 4 pages)

Sponsors: Bloomberg LP, Booz & Company, Intel, Pfizer, Siemens AG

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The Battle for Female Talent in China

Just as China is feeling the talent squeeze of rapid growth, Chinese women are emerging as a deeply qualified and ambitious talent pool, rivaling not only Chinese men but also their US counterparts. The study reveals the extent to which Chinese women are surpassing their peers, but also how they’re impacted by cultural traditions and demographic trends that are quite different from their female counterparts in other nations. They have a solid foothold in the high-echelon talent pool; they are enormously ambitious and passionate about their work; and they are playing an ever-larger role in the economic progress of their countries. Yet little attention has been paid to understanding this talent pool that is undoubtedly essential to the success of any player in the Chinese economy. An important component of this study is an exploration of best practice in the private sector—cutting-edge initiatives that leverage the newly-rich pool of female talent. (3/1/2010, Report - 70 pages, Key findings also available in Chinese)

Sponsors: Bloomberg LP, Booz & Company, Intel, Pfizer, Siemens AG

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The Battle for Female Talent in India

As multinational corporations look to the developing market dynamo of India to power them out of the recession and debt crisis, women will comprise one of the main engines of growth. Educated women are pouring into the professional workforce. They have a solid foothold in the high-echelon talent pool; they are enormously ambitious and passionate about their work; and they are playing an ever-larger role in the economic progress of their countries. An important component of this study is an exploration of best practice in the private sector—cutting-edge initiatives that leverage the newly-rich pool of female talent. (12/1/2010, Report - 56 pages)

Sponsors: Bloomberg LP, Booz & Company, Intel, Pfizer, Siemens AG

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